When referring to the concept of distracted driving, it’s common for people to automatically think of texting and making calls while behind the wheel. While any form of hand-held phone usage is a form of distracted driving, there are also many other activities that could be defined as such.

If you were involved in a car accident, it is a good idea to consider whether you believe that distracted driving was a contributing factor in the incident. If you believe that the other driver was at fault, you should take the time to understand the different types of distracted driving and assess whether any form of distracted driving could have been present.

Visual distraction

A driver’s eyes should be on the road at all times. This means that if a driver looks at their phone or attends to their children in the car, they will be driving while distracted.

Manual distraction

Manual distraction counts as any situation in which a driver’s hands are not prioritizing the operation of the vehicle. Eating and drinking while driving should be avoided for this reason, as should holding a phone or smoking.

Cognitive distraction

Cognitive distraction can be more difficult to prove because it involves another’s inner thoughts. However, drivers should not operate a vehicle when they are not able to give their full attention to the road. If a person is driving when very upset or angry, they may be engaging in distracted driving.

If you have been involved in an accident in Michigan, it is important that you take action to learn about your options regarding establishing fault.