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labor day drunk driving prevention

Michigan Officers Encourage Safe and Sober Driving This Labor Day

By Lipton Law on September 1, 2011 - No comments

The Labor Day weekend and the weeks between it are prime time for Michigan students of all ages to be heading back to school. In order to help reduce the number of car accidents and keep traveling students and families safe this season, the Michigan State Police and local law enforcement agencies are teaming up to increase drunk driving prevention patrols and sobriety checkpoints throughout the state. Michigan’s enforcement efforts are related to a nationwide program sponsored by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) known as “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”

The Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning is kicking off this year’s events with an advertising campaign reminding Labor Day motorists that they create an increased risk of causing injury or death, along with an increased risk of being pulled over and arrested, if they choose to drive with alcohol in their systems. Many events are being held on college campuses because last year, 77 Michigan motorists between the ages of 18 to 24 were killed in alcohol-related crashes, representing nearly one-quarter of those killed in such accidents. By tying the “drive sober or get pulled over” message to the start of the school year, Michigan law enforcement agencies hope to drive home the point that college-age drivers are also vulnerable to injury or death when it comes to drinking and driving.

Choosing a designated driver or taking a cab or public transportation can help you prevent injuries or death caused by drunk driving this Labor Day. If you have been injured in a car accident involving a drunk driver, contact the experienced Michigan drunk driving accident victim lawyers at Lipton Law. We can help you protect your legal rights, handle your insurance claim, and seek compensation from all negligent parties involved. For a free consultation, call us today at 248-577-1688.